Galleries Curate: RHE
Aki Sasamoto, Tsuruko Yamazaki
Mar. 9 until Apr. 3, 2021
Presented by Take Ninagawa in Tokyo

  • Aki Sasamoto
  • Tsuruko Yamazaki

On the occasion of Galleries Curate: RHE, Take Ninagawa in Tokyo is presenting works by Aki Sasamoto and Tsuruko Yamazaki.

The exhibition will be on view from March 9 until April 3, 2021.

For more information about the works on view, please contact info@takeninagawa.com

Aki Sasamoto

Aki Sasamoto is a New York-based Japanese artist who works in performance, sculpture, dance, and whatever other medium it takes to get her ideas across. Her works have been shown both in performing art and visual art venues worldwide. She has collaborated with musicians, choreographers, scientists and scholars, and she plays multiple roles as dancer, sculptor, or director.

Sasamoto's performance/installation works revolve around gestures of nothing and everything. Her installations are careful arrangements of sculpturally altered found objects, and the decisive gestures of her improvisational performances create feedback, responding to sound, objects, and moving bodies. The constructed stories seem personal at first, yet oddly open to varying degrees of access, relation, and reflection.

Talking in Circles in Talking (2021) is an inquiry into the extent the human body can be transformed into a physical object, much like how our consciousness of a dead person can be turned into a memento. Melting ice blocks contain things that carry people's memories. The drips of the ice and the sounds of the falling objects are amplified via hand-made contact microphones attached to the cooking bowls.

Aki Sasamoto
Talking in Circles in Talking, 2021
Stainless steel mixing bowls, ice picks, handmade contact microphones, sound mixer, gaff tape, zip tie, plastic stoppers, shoelaces, small found objects, ice blocks and melting sound Dimensions variable

Tsuruko Yamazaki

Born in 1925 in Ashiya, Hyogo Prefecture, Tsuruko Yamazaki was a founding member of the Gutai Art Association. Formed in 1954, the Gutai group innovated practices such as happenings and site-specific installations through events including the Outdoor Gutai Art Exhibition, held at Ashiya Park in 1956, and Gutai Art on Stage, held at Sankei Hall in Tokyo in 1957.

From the start Yamazaki pushed Gutai’s focus on the concrete and the material into radical directions. She frequently experimented with reflective surfaces and projected light, both dematerializing the work and inviting viewers to become part of the material. Yamazaki said her interest in light was inspired by the urban environment of the postwar period in Japan, where, with few ambient light sources, the headlights of passing cars catching upon scrap metal, bits of glass, and other street detritus would scatter the darkness with sudden bursts of illumination.

One of Yamazaki’s most recognizable works, Untitled (2011, 2012), was made by applying dye and lacquer to tin panel, which was a typical construction material in post war Japan. Yamazaki created the image improvisationally by moving the panel with her hands. Having debuted the work at the 4th Gutai Art Exhibition at Ohara Kaikan Hall in Tokyo in 1957, Yamazaki revisited the work in her later life through a series of tin panel pieces that would become her last paintings.

Tsuruko Yamazaki
Work, 2011
Dye, lacquer and thinner on tin
93 x 93 cm

Tsuruko Yamazaki
Work, 2011
Dye, lacquer and thinner on tin
93 x 93 cm

Tsuruko Yamazaki
Work, 2012
Dye, lacquer and thinner on tin
93 x 93 cm

Tsuruko Yamazaki
Work, 2011
Dye, lacquer and thinner on tin
93 x 93 cm